Tulips, grapes and Pears

Every year (except this one) I have bought tulips and planted them in large pots so I could have painting material in the spring. This past October was so warm  and dry that I knew it would be hard to grow  tulips because they require at least 6 weeks of cold weather to bloom.  So I dug out my trusty artificial tulips and found a few photographs of tulips to paint this picture.

Here’s a technique tip:  You can remove acrylic varnish with alcohol but you can make corrections on top of Liquitex gloss or matt medium varnish.  Remember to reseal the entire painting with varnish when you have finished.

Sunflowers #3 in the Series

All of the sunflower paintings in this series were done with acrylics.I think that the most important thing to remember when starting a painting is the location of the light source.  Where is the light coming from?  Most of the time I like for the light to come from the left side.  The second question I always ask myself is “Where is the focal point?”  It is better to have only one focal point, and to emphasize one plane:  The foreground, or the middle, or the background.

Sunflowers

I love to paint sunflowers.  I have done a number of pictures of sunflowers and never seem to tire of painting them.

I learned a neat thing from Homer Allbritten, an artist friend now deceased, about using a “mother” color.  He said to add a single color in all mixtures throughout the painting and this would easily achieve a unifying effect.  I don’t think I always do this, but I am more pleased with my paintings when I remember to do so!

Tulips, Pears and a Pitcher

More artificial flowers used as models.  The pears are also in my inventory of artificial fruits and flowers.
Richard Schmid, an artist I admire, said that a painter should ask herself several questions:  Which side of the subject is lightest?  Is the color clear and sharp or diffused? Where are the lost edges?  What are the most powerful colors?  Where is the thick paint going?  Where is the thin paint going?